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Youth health education

Health and literacy are closely linked, and thus, influence other parameters of youth inclusion and diversity such as inequality, discrimination, power relations, income levels.

Youth Health > Youth health education ALAIN NKAZAMUREGOYouth health education no comment

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A1S1YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYYOUTH HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A01. Empowerment in youth health and rights

Reflecting on experience workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop is used to capture the motivation, imagination, and energy of the workshop audience. Reflecting activities encourage workshop participants to look back on their own personal and/or professional behaviour in a way that prepares them for new learning and change. Reflection is often used at the beginning of a workshop or at a transition from one topic to another. To design a reflecting activity, it is important to identify the past experience that you want to invoke and to do so in an engaging way that can be linked to the workshop topic.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on their youth rights and health during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth rights and health in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide the participants in small groups. Ask each member of the group to think of and share with the group at least five (5) words that each set describe “Youth Health” and “Youth Rights” based on their experiences and knowledge.
  2. Upon completion of this spontaneous interaction, ask each group to analyse and interpret different words from all participants to generate one Word Cloud for each term composed only of ten (10) words that reflect everyone in the group.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret the terms “Youth Health” and “Youth Rights” and create a list of at least five (5) types of Youth Health and a list of at least five (5) types of Youth Rights. Then provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Which type of three (3) interventions in the context of non-formal education that youth work can use in order to effectively meet youth’s learning needs and knowledge gaps in Youth Health and Youth Rights?
  2. What do you think are the most appropriate training activities that youth can participate in, in order to strengthen their knowledge, skills, or attitudes of Youth Health and Youth Rights?
  3. Create one complete training activity that can strengthen youth knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Youth Health and Youth Rights.
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “youth health literacy” and “youth rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of youth health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of youth health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
  1. You can adapt the questions to the profile of the group and context in which a workshop takes place.
  2. This activity works best with small groups, 20-25 participants
A2S2YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYYOUTH HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A02. Challenges to youth health and rights

Experimenting and practicing workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop encourages participants to use knowledge in a practical way. These activities provide an opportunity for participants to practice and involve themselves in new behaviours and skills. The workshop provides participants a safe environment in which to try out new things before putting them into practice in the "real world." To design experimenting activities, it is important to identify the specific skills you want participants to acquire and to provide ways for these skills to be practiced in a useful way. Role plays are commonly used as experimenting activities in workshops.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on their youth rights and health during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth rights and health in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in their youth work.
  1. Ask each participant to present a situation describing a time in their lives when they felt excluded or unable to claim, exercise, realise, or enjoy right(s) to health?
  2. Divide participants in small groups. In their small groups, ask each participant to present their situation. Ask them to listen to each-other and then to compare any similarities and differences among those situations.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret various situations from all participants in the group to identify common aspects enough to create a one situation story that reflects everyone in the group. Then provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Which type of three (3) interventions in the context of non-formal education that youth work can use in order to effectively meet youth’s learning needs and knowledge gaps in Youth Health and Youth Rights?
  2. What do you think are the most appropriate training activities that youth can participate in, in order to strengthen their knowledge, skills, or attitudes of Youth Health and Youth Rights?
  3. Create one complete training activity that can strengthen youth knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Youth Health and Youth Rights.
  4. Did the interpretations of various situations provide you the opportunity to learn how to overcome differences and become allies to address a common problem from different perspectives? If yes, how? If no, why not?
  5. How can youth education and training offerings in the field of youth health literacy address the needs, gaps, or challenges expressed in your one situation to fully claim, exercise, realise, and enjoy the right(s) to health?
  6. Which learning activities the person(s) in your one situation could undertake or be involved in, in order to strengthen knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to claim, exercise, realise, and enjoy the right(s) to health?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “youth health literacy” and “youth rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of youth health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of youth health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
  1. You can adapt the questions to the profile of the group and context in which a workshop takes place.
  2. This activity works best with small groups, 20-25 participants
A3S3YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYYOUTH HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A03. Raising awareness on youth health and rights

Planning for application workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop provides a stimulus for implementing and utilizing new learning outside the workshop context. Planning activities prepare participants for and increase the likelihood of transfer of learning to new context or in their work environment. These activities are often used at the conclusion of a workshop or when the focus of the workshop is about to shift from one topic to another. To design planning activities, it is important to identify ways to have participants look toward the future and identify specific ways to put new learning into practice.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on their youth rights and health during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth rights and health in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide participants into their small groups of 4 or 5 persons per group. Then give each small group a flip chart and Handout-A03.1. and Handout-A03.2.
  2. Ask each group to discussion the example of the counter-narrative campaign on Handout-A03.1. The discussions should focus on participants’ interpretations, descriptions, and meanings the make out of that campaign.
  3. After concluding the discussions in small groups, ask each group to use a flipchart to complete Handout-A03.2. Ask each group:
  1. To think about the youth health and rights problem context they would like to raise awareness about through counter-narrative/alternative campaign?
  2. To describe the characteristics of the audience they want to target. What is the behavioural or social change they aim to contribute to?
  3. To describe how they will achieve that impact. How many people do they aim to reach? How much campaign content do they aim to produce? How many times per week do they plan to post a new content?
  4. To create campaign’s content: message(s); medium for each message; and call to action for each message. Which social media channels will they use to run the campaign? Which methods will they use to measure the impact?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “youth health literacy” and “youth rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of youth health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of youth health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
  1. You can adapt the questions to the profile of the group and context in which a workshop takes place.
  2. This activity works best with small groups, 20-25 participants
A4S1YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYSEXUAL HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A04. Empowerment in youth sexual health and rights

Reflecting on experience workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop is used to capture the motivation, imagination, and energy of the workshop audience. Reflecting activities encourage workshop participants to look back on their own personal and/or professional behaviour in a way that prepares them for new learning and change. Reflection is often used at the beginning of a workshop or at a transition from one topic to another. To design a reflecting activity, it is important to identify the past experience that you want to invoke and to do so in an engaging way that can be linked to the workshop topic.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on their youth rights and health during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth rights and health in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth rights and health literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide the participants in small groups. Ask each member of the group to think of and share with the group at least five (5) words that each set describe “Youth Sexual Health” and “Youth Sexual Rights” based on their experiences.
  2. Upon completion of this spontaneous interaction, ask each group to analyse and interpret different words from all participants to generate one Word Cloud for each term composed only of ten (10) words that reflect everyone in the group.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret the terms “Youth Sexual Health” and “Youth Sexual Rights” and create a list of five (5) types of Youth Sexual Health and a list of five (5) types of Youth Sexual Rights. Then provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Which type of three (3) interventions in the context of non-formal education that youth work can use in order to effectively meet youth’s learning needs and knowledge gaps in Youth Sexual Health and Youth Sexual Rights?
  2. What do you think are the most appropriate training activities that youth can participate in, in order to strengthen their knowledge, skills, or attitudes of Youth Sexual Health and Youth Sexual Rights?
  3. Create one complete training activity that can strengthen youth knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Youth Sexual Health and Youth Sexual Rights
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “sexual health literacy” and “sexual rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of sexual health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of sexual health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
  1. You can adapt the questions to the profile of the group and context in which a workshop takes place.
  2. This activity works best with small groups, 20-25 participants
A5S2YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYSEXUAL HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A05. Challenges to youth sexual health and rights

Experimenting and practicing workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop encourages participants to use knowledge in a practical way. These activities provide an opportunity for participants to practice and involve themselves in new behaviours and skills. The workshop provides participants a safe environment in which to try out new things before putting them into practice in the "real world." To design experimenting activities, it is important to identify the specific skills you want participants to acquire and to provide ways for these skills to be practiced in a useful way. Role plays are commonly used as experimenting activities in workshops.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on youth sexual health and rights during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth sexual health and rights literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth Sexual health and rights in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth Sexual health and rights literacy in their youth work.
  1. Ask each participant to present a situation describing a time in their lives when they felt excluded or unable to claim, exercise, enjoy the rights to sexual health?
  2. Divide participants in small groups. In their small groups, ask each participant to present their situation. Ask them to listen to each-other and then to compare any similarities and differences among those situations.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret various situations from all participants in the group to identify common aspects enough to create a one situation story that reflects everyone in the group. Then provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Did the interpretations of various situations provide you the opportunity to learn how to overcome differences and become allies to address a common problem from different perspectives? If yes, how? If no, why not?
  2. How can youth education and training offerings in the field of youth health literacy address the needs, gaps, or challenges expressed in your one situation to fully claim, exercise, and enjoy the rights to sexual health?
  3. Which learning activities the person(s) in your one situation could undertake or be involved in, in order to strengthen knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to claim, exercise, realise, and enjoy the rights to sexual health?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “sexual health literacy” and “sexual rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of sexual health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of sexual health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A6S3YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYSEXUAL HEALTH AND RIGHTS

A06. Raising awareness on youth sexual health and rights

Planning for application workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop provides a stimulus for implementing and utilizing new learning outside the workshop context. Planning activities prepare participants for and increase the likelihood of transfer of learning to new context or in their work environment. These activities are often used at the conclusion of a workshop or when the focus of the workshop is about to shift from one topic to another. To design planning activities, it is important to identify ways to have participants look toward the future and identify specific ways to put new learning into practice.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on youth sexual health and rights during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth sexual health and rights literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth Sexual health and rights in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth Sexual health and rights literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide participants into their small groups of 4 or 5 persons per group. Then give each small group a flip chart and Handout-A06.1. and Handout-A06.2.
  2. Ask each group to discussion the example of the counter-narrative campaign on Handout-A06.1. The discussions should focus on participants’ interpretations, descriptions, and meanings the make out of that campaign.
  3. After concluding the discussions in small groups, ask each group to use a flipchart to complete Handout-A06.2. Ask each group:
  1. To think about the sexual health and rights problem context they would like to raise awareness about through counter-narrative/alternative campaign?
  2. To describe the characteristics of the audience they want to target. What is the behavioural or social change they aim to contribute to?
  3. To describe how they will achieve that impact. How many people do they aim to reach? How much campaign content do they aim to produce? How many times per week do they plan to post a new content?
  4. To create campaign’s content: message(s); medium for each message; and call to action for each message. Which social media channels will they use to run the campaign? Which methods will they use to measure the impact?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “sexual health literacy” and “sexual rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of sexual health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of sexual health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • he themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A7S1YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYMENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS

A07. Empowerment in youth mental health and wellbeing

Reflecting on experience workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop is used to capture the motivation, imagination, and energy of the workshop audience. Reflecting activities encourage workshop participants to look back on their own personal and/or professional behaviour in a way that prepares them for new learning and change. Reflection is often used at the beginning of a workshop or at a transition from one topic to another. To design a reflecting activity, it is important to identify the past experience that you want to invoke and to do so in an engaging way that can be linked to the workshop topic.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide the participants in small groups. Ask each member of the group to think of and share with the group at least five (5) words that each set describe “Youth Mental Health” and “Youth Mental Wellbeing” based on their experiences.
  2. Upon completion of this spontaneous interaction, ask each group to analyse and interpret different words from all participants to generate one Word Cloud for each term composed only of ten (10) words that reflect everyone in the group.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret the terms “Youth Mental Health” and “Youth Mental Wellbeing” and create a list of five (5) types of Youth Mental Health and of five (5) types of Youth Mental Wellbeing. Provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Which type of three (3) interventions in the context of non-formal education that youth work can use in order to effectively meet youth’s learning needs and knowledge gaps in Youth Mental Health and Youth Mental Wellbeing?
  2. What do you think are the most appropriate training activities that youth can participate in, in order to strengthen their knowledge, skills, or attitudes of Youth Mental Health and Youth Mental Wellbeing?
  3. Create one complete training activity that can strengthen youth knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Youth Mental Health and Youth Mental Wellbeing.
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “youth health literacy” and “youth rights literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of youth health and rights problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of youth health and rights literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “mental health literacy” and “mental well-being literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of mental health and well-being problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of mental health and well-being literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A8S2YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYMENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS

A08. Challenges to youth mental health and wellbeing

Experimenting and practicing workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop encourages participants to use knowledge in a practical way. These activities provide an opportunity for participants to practice and involve themselves in new behaviours and skills. The workshop provides participants a safe environment in which to try out new things before putting them into practice in the "real world." To design experimenting activities, it is important to identify the specific skills you want participants to acquire and to provide ways for these skills to be practiced in a useful way. Role plays are commonly used as experimenting activities in workshops.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in their youth work.
  1. Ask each participant to present a situation describing a time in their lives when they felt excluded or unable to claim, exercise, enjoy the rights to mental health?
  2. Divide participants in small groups. In their small groups, ask each participant to present their situation. Ask them to listen to each-other and then to compare any similarities and differences among those situations.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret various situations from all participants in the group to identify common aspects enough to create a one situation story that reflects everyone in the group. Then provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Did the interpretations of various situations provide you the opportunity to learn how to overcome differences and become allies to address a common problem from different perspectives? If yes, how? If no, why not?
  2. How can youth education and training offerings in the field of youth health literacy address the needs, gaps, or challenges expressed in your one situation to fully claim, exercise, and enjoy the rights to mental health?
  3. Which learning activities the person(s) in your one situation could undertake or be involved in, in order to strengthen knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to claim, exercise, realise, and enjoy the rights to mental health?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “mental health literacy” and “mental well-being literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of mental health and well-being problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of mental health and well-being literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A9S3YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYMENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS

A09. Raising awareness on youth mental health and wellbeing

Planning for application workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop provides a stimulus for implementing and utilizing new learning outside the workshop context. Planning activities prepare participants for and increase the likelihood of transfer of learning to new context or in their work environment. These activities are often used at the conclusion of a workshop or when the focus of the workshop is about to shift from one topic to another. To design planning activities, it is important to identify ways to have participants look toward the future and identify specific ways to put new learning into practice.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on youth mental health and wellness in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate youth mental health and wellness literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide participants into their small groups of 4 or 5 persons per group. Then give each small group a flip chart and Handout-A09.1. and Handout-A09.2.
  2. Ask each group to discussion the example of the counter-narrative campaign on Handout-A09.1. The discussions should focus on participants’ interpretations, descriptions, and meanings the make out of that campaign.
  3. After concluding the discussions in small groups, ask each group to use a flipchart to complete Handout-A09.2. Ask each group:
  1. To think about the youth mental health and well-being problem context they want to raise awareness about through counter-narrative campaign?
  2. To describe the characteristics of the audience they want to target. What is the behavioural or social change they aim to contribute to?
  3. To describe how they will achieve that impact. How many people do they aim to reach? How much campaign content do they aim to produce? How many times per week do they plan to post a new content?
  4. To create campaign’s content: message(s); medium for each message; and call to action for each message. Which social media channels will they use to run the campaign? Which methods will they use to measure the impact?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “mental health literacy” and “mental well-being literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of mental health and well-being problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of mental health and well-being literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • he themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A10S1YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYDRUG ABUSE AND WELLBEING

A10. Empowerment in drug prevention and youth wellbeing

Reflecting on experience workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop is used to capture the motivation, imagination, and energy of the workshop audience. Reflecting activities encourage workshop participants to look back on their own personal and/or professional behaviour in a way that prepares them for new learning and change. Reflection is often used at the beginning of a workshop or at a transition from one topic to another. To design a reflecting activity, it is important to identify the past experience that you want to invoke and to do so in an engaging way that can be linked to the workshop topic.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing during training interactions.
  2. >
  3. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide the participants in small groups. Ask each member of the group to think of and share with the group at least five (5) words that each set describe “Drug Abuse Prevention and “Youth Wellbeing” based on their experiences.
  2. Upon completion of this spontaneous interaction, ask each group to analyse and interpret different words from all participants to generate one Word Cloud for each term composed only of ten (10) words that reflect everyone in the group.
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret the terms “Drug Abuse Prevention and “Youth Wellbeing” and create a list of five (5) types of Drug Abuse Prevention and of five (5) types of Youth Wellbeing. Provide a flipchart to each group:
  1. Which type of three (3) interventions in the context of non-formal education that youth work can use in order to effectively meet youth’s learning needs and knowledge gaps in Drug Abuse Prevention and Youth Wellbeing?
  2. What do you think are the most appropriate training activities that youth can participate in, in order to strengthen their knowledge, skills, or attitudes of Drug Abuse Prevention and Youth Wellbeing?
  3. Create one complete training activity that can strengthen youth knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Drug Abuse Prevention and Youth Wellbeing.
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “drug abuse prevention” and “youth wellbeing literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of drug abuse and youth wellbeing problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of drug abuse and wellbeing literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A11S2YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYDRUG ABUSE AND WELLBEING

A11. Challenges to drug abuse prevention among youth

Experimenting and practicing workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop encourages participants to use knowledge in a practical way. These activities provide an opportunity for participants to practice and involve themselves in new behaviours and skills. The workshop provides participants a safe environment in which to try out new things before putting them into practice in the "real world." To design experimenting activities, it is important to identify the specific skills you want participants to acquire and to provide ways for these skills to be practiced in a useful way. Role plays are commonly used as experimenting activities in workshops.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in their youth work.
  1. Ask each participant to imagine one situation that can occur or has occurred in his or her personal or professional life that represents a case of drug abuse that escalated into addiction?
  2. Divide participants in small groups and ask each participant to present their situation. Ask them to analyse each situation and come up with the types of risk factors each of the situations of drug abuse could be associated with. What type of harm, problems, or effects such a situation of drug abuse could cause?
  3. Ask them to analyse and interpret various situations from all participants in the group to identify the protective factors that should have been in place to prevent each of the situation of drug abuse. Create a list of protective factors that reflects each situation.
  1. Did the interpretations of various situations provide you the opportunity to learn how to overcome differences and become allies to address a common problem from different perspectives? If yes, how? If no, why not?
  2. How can youth education and training offerings in the field of youth health literacy address the risk factors expressed in your situations to prevent each situation from escalating into addiction?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “drug abuse prevention” and “youth wellbeing literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of drug abuse and youth wellbeing problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of drug abuse and wellbeing literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
A12S3YOUTH HEALTH LITERACYDRUG ABUSE AND WELLBEING

A12. Raising awareness on drug abuse and youth wellbeing

Experimenting and practicing workshop

Experiential learning: Workshop-based learning

This workshop encourages participants to use knowledge in a practical way. These activities provide an opportunity for participants to practice and involve themselves in new behaviours and skills. The workshop provides participants a safe environment in which to try out new things before putting them into practice in the "real world." To design experimenting activities, it is important to identify the specific skills you want participants to acquire and to provide ways for these skills to be practiced in a useful way. Role plays are commonly used as experimenting activities in workshops.

Young people; youth workers or youth educators; trainers or facilitators; youth-based organisations; and other educators involved in youth education and training.

  1. Develop participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes on how to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing during training interactions.
  2. Strengthen participants’ training skills and capacity in using interactive learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in youth work.
  1. Participants are able to apply gained knowledge and skills to engage with young people on drug abuse and youth wellbeing in their youth work.
  2. Participants are able to use interactive training learning activities to integrate drug abuse and youth wellbeing literacy in their youth work.
  1. Divide participants into their small groups of 4 or 5 persons per group. Then give each small group a flip chart and Handout-A12.1. and Handout-A12.2.
  2. Ask each group to discussion the example of the counter-narrative campaign on Handout-A12.1. The discussions should focus on participants’ interpretations, descriptions, and meanings the make out of that campaign.
  3. After concluding the discussions in small groups, ask each group to use a flipchart to complete Handout-A12.2. Ask each group:
  1. To think about the drug abuse and youth wellbeing problem context they want to raise awareness about through counter-narrative campaign?
  2. To describe the characteristics of the audience they want to target. What is the behavioural or social change they aim to contribute to?
  3. To describe how they will achieve that impact. How many people do they aim to reach? How much campaign content do they aim to produce? How many times per week do they plan to post a new content?
  4. To create campaign’s content: message(s); medium for each message; and call to action for each message. Which social media channels will they use to run the campaign? Which methods will they use to measure the impact?
  • Check the results in the bigger group with all participants. Discuss the experience with the participants. Ask questions such as:
  1. How did you manage to do the activity?
  2. Are you satisfied with the results of your group?
  3. What was difficult and how could it be done better?
  • Then use the follow-up questions for interactive discussions:
  1. How can you define or characterise the terms “drug abuse prevention” and “youth wellbeing literacy”? What do they have to do with each other?
  2. What challenges and opportunities are you facing in dealing with or addressing different forms of drug abuse and youth wellbeing problems in your practice or work?
  3. How do you see a lack of youth drug abuse prevention literacy impacting you personally or the communities or the groups that you work with?
  • Flipchart paper, large sticky notes, markers, and a tape.
  • A wall with enough space to attach several sheets of flipchart.

90 Minutes: As a facilitator you should expect to spend:

  • 15 Minutes for presenting the painting and giving instructions.
  • 50 Minutes for participants to complete their tasks in small groups.
  • 25 Minutes for reflection and discussion during debriefing.
  • This activity brings together different concepts related to what youth need to make effective health decisions for themselves as a means to develop healthier lifestyles necessary to achieve a greater state of health and well-being. We have created a set of 12 workshop learning activities that reflects essential themes in the field of youth health literacy.
  • The themes including Youth mental health and wellbeing, Drug abuse and youth well-being, Gender and sexual health literacy, and Digital youth health literacy are discussed, and each is linked to a workshop learning activity. So, beyond having experience in youth health literacy, the facilitator should have experience in human rights education and cultural literacy to facilitator this workshop.
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